Newspaper Archive of
Quad City Herald
Brewster, Washington
Lyft
August 30, 1929     Quad City Herald
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August 30, 1929
 

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i i ii i i ii i RWSTi iRAL in i Food Buyers! Opportunity Days---days of extra value-glv- ing---are he, re. We have stocked our store to the fullest with quality foods for this event. Every item is a big value, every item is guarantel. And every salesperson is redynalert and eager to help you. So take ad,'antage of these Opportu- nity Day values! Stock your pantry with these choice foods- AUG. 31ST. TO SEPT. 7TH, INCLUSIVE CORNED BEEF, Emery Brand, No. 1, 2 Cans .... 49 SLICED BEEF, Rival, 21/2 oz. glass, 2 For. ...... 29 SANDWICH SPREAD Delicia, /s, Per Can .... 10 PEAS, Twin Peaks, New Pack, 2 Seive, 2s, 2 Cans ........................................ 35 PEAS, Brentwood, New Pack, Fancy, Ungraded, 2s, 2 Cans ............................... 25 SPINACH, Del Monte, New Pack, No. 2/2 Can 2. For ........................................... 33 C. & H. SUGAR, Powder- ed or Brown 1 lb pkg., 3For ........................................... 25 Heinz KETCHUP 2 LARGE .47 BOTTLES ......... SPAGHETTI, Van Camp's, Prepared, 2 Medium Cans .......... 19 BLUE ROSE RICE 5 lbs ............................... 33 SEEDLESS RAIS- INS, 4 lb Bags ....... 25 .l CLAMS, Minced, Pioneer I/.,s, 2 Cans ............................ 35 SALMON, Pink, Happy- vale, 1 Ib Tall, 2 Cans .33 SALMON, Sockeye, Libby's Fancy Alaska, 1 lb Tall 2 Cans ........................................ 53 j I ASPARAGUS TIPS, Lib- by's, Medium Green, ls Square, 2 Cans ................... 63 ASPARAGUS TIPS, Hills- dale, Ungraded, ls Square, 2 Cans ................ :.53 KIDNEY BEANS, Van Camp's, Med. Cans 2 For ........................................... 19 CUBELETS SUGAR C & H, 8 oz., pkg. 2 For ....... 15 Jelly Puffed Rice Hunt's Supreme Pure Fruit, 6 oz. sines, z For .19 I KELLOG'S All Bran, 2 pkgs ........... 37 MOTHER'S Oats, Quick with China Pkg. ' .35 BUCKEYE Rolled Oats 9 lb. sack .48 QUAKER, Macaroni, lb, Spaghetti pkg. 2 For ............................ 17 MUFFETS (Whole Wheat Bis- cuit) ...................................................................... 10 BAKERS Premium Cocoanut lb. pkg ............................................... 19 Puffed Wheat Quaker Brand 29l Quaker Bra.d 2 Pkgs ........... ., ............ 2 Pkgs ...................... Pre- serves Hunt's Supreme 23 Strawberry, 3 lb jar ................ .63 GOLD DUST Washing Powder 2 large pkgs .................................................. 47 LUX SOAP FLAKES, 2 large pkgs .................................................. 47 LUX Toilet Soap, 4 bars .27 CRYSTAL White Soap, 10 bars ................................................................ 39 CREME Oil Soap, 5 bars ................... 27 PALMOLIVE Soap, 5 bars ................ 37 I HEINZ BEANS IROYALBAKING IOLD DUTCH POWDER [ Oven Baked, Medium [ CLEANSER I o oz, can ......................... 22 | Size Can, 2 For ....... 25[ 12 oz. can ...................... 391 4 cans for ..'. ...................... 27 ii SMALL WHITE BEANS, 5 lbs. 52c----LARGE WHITE BEANS, 5 lbs. 42c Take advantage of the low prices now You can make your best buys in feeds in effect and buy your Fine Cane Sug- ar, 100 lbs ............................. : ...................... $6.10 at MacMarrs. . SR.WSTER'WAsHIC;ro NATIONAL DOPE Written for This" Paper by FRANK P. LITSCHERT Ever sihhe the (tuestion of a revis- ion of the tariff came up. we have been treated to a regular'barrage of criticism from free trade newspapers hnporters and internationalist states- men to the effect that any increase in our tariff wouhl result in severe reprisals from Europe and the rest of the world. Any raising of rates to protect the Ameriacn worker and American farmer, they have declal'- ed, would create so much resentment in Europe that we would be traeted to a first class trade war which would ruin our foreign commerce and cripple our prosperity. to prevent half of Emope from cam- ing to the United States. PerhaI) Europe hates us because of out" pro- tective tariff but we doubt it. How- ever, even if tile ,l'overnn-lont over there do not agree with our ecnom- ic policies the common people must like them. Otherwise our immi'ra- tion laws would be unnecessary and European quotas wouhl not be fill- ed so many months in advance. The sooner the nations of tim Ohl 'World realize that there is something desirable other than the cheapest sort of production, and se,k to raise their own living standards to ours, rather than to pull ours downward, the sooner we can lower our tariff chedules with impunity. True it is that this barrage has not been so fierce during the past few weeks as it was early in the an- ti-tariff campaign. Either the frec traders have stopped to cool off their guns or they have gradually learned that these European threats are pure buncombe, created only by those who desire larger importations from across theseas. Our foreign trade i is increasing steadily and constantly I and there is no evidence that there I will be a recession in the near fu- ture. f But in "{q'ew of all these charges I by American free traders and inter- l 1 nationalists, it is interesting to note / what the other fellow has to say a- t bout us. La Patrie, published in" Montreal, recently had this to say of the United States and its tariff pol- icy: "No one will pretend that the eco- nomic policy in force in the United States is not the fundamental cause of the great prosperity enjoyed by our neighbors. The goverment of the United States first of all pro- i tects by a high tariff the domestic i market for American producers and then proceeds to encourage the ex- port trade. Our country would gain ili::!!!:. by following this example As Mr. !ifiiiiiii:, Bennett stated at Revelstoke in British Columbia, a similar policy, by favoring a vigorbus expansion of em- ployment would prevent emigration taking an immense toll each year el our population." Here is .something well said and to the point. It is true that our prosperity is due to our economic policies which are built on the cor- nerstone of protection to American industry. It is also' to be noted that while we are prosperous and busy the countries which for one reason or another still cling to the low wage scale and the cheapest meth- ods of production are not so busy and prosperous There must be some reason for this, and there is. It is to be found in our economic policy,, which calls for protection mass production and the creation thereby of a great home market-in which it is possible for all the people who work to enjoy modern comforts and a standard of living which was undreamed of a few years ago. Nothing is more significant than  the fact that while Canada, already sparsely populated in many sections, is losing by emigration, the United States is compelled to erect barriers the poultry industry In 1917 the Washington Cooperative Egg asso- ciation had a capitalization of $2000 Today this figure stands at $4,000,- 00,0. In 1917 the organization,- did a $250,000 business and in 1928 over $20,000,000 business. With a record of 344 eggs in a single year, Lady Excelsior, a White Leghorn hen own ed by the State College of Washing- ton, held the national egg laying championship for White Leghorns in 1927. The average porduction per THIS STATE LEADS IN P REDUCTION ington D. C. takes 33.6 per cent of he in 1924 in Washington was 93. OF APPLES, LUMBER, RASPBERRIES its carlot unloads from Washington "Other important products of the and Oregon and only four per cent state include peas, prunes, berries from New York State. bulbs, garden seeds and lettuce. The Washington State College, Aug. land Major Resources." "Land near Coupeville on Whidby #neat industry is confined largely to 24, Did you know that the state of "With the lumbering industry av- Island has been known to produce the utilization of the range available, Washington produces more lumber,. [ eraging between 100 and 300 million . '16 bush_le ..... s of 11onqrrlated" " w_eath on hogs supplement the dairy industry apples and raspberries than any oth- I dollars in annual production, it a- ! a single acre, a record enequalled to a certain extent and farm flocks er state in the union; that it holds[bout equals the agricultural industrY 4 any other vlace in the world La- of sheep serve as scavengers. the world's record in non-irrigated of the state as a whole," Professor .' [ Conner Flats has also produced as "The wide variation of climate in wheat and oat production on a single. Severance declared. "The fishing much _sa __617 __shebu ls of dr_-lv ........ and oats Washington, which ranges from a- acre; that it boasts the world's chain- and mining industry each produce an [ on o oi,,l ore anoh ...... a ++ bout six inches precipitation around  pion dairy ,cow, a former natmnal annual income of between 10 and 15 t stands by itself. ' Pasco to 132 inches west of the O- champion white Leghorn hen, and million dollars: lympic mountains in western Wash- 'rhe average production of Wash. ington dairy herds is 40 per cent a- bove the United States average, and in the counties where the dairy in- dustry is more specialized, the aver- age is 75 per cent above the nation- al figure. Segis Pieterje Prospect, Ington, is responsible for the great diversification and specialization in agriculture For instance', rainy "Twenty-five to 30 per cent of the commercial apple crop of the United: States comes fram Washington, and this figure has exceeded 31 per cent. It is an interesting fact that New York City, located in a state which WOOdefires are man made, there- fore can be prevented. AUGUZT O ]., that It holds second *place .in pear production and in average milk pro- duction per cow? These were some of the interesting facts dslclosed by Professor George Severance, head of the department of farm management at the State College, in a recent address before the House of Representatives appro- priations subcommittee on agricul- ture which visited the State College while on its western tour in July. Professor Severance spoke on "Some- tltiag of Washington's Agriculture stands second in the United States world's champion dairycow who has in apple production, receives 446 produced 37,000 pounds or more per cent of ts carlot unloads from' l than 18 h tons in a single year, is Washington, Oregon and Idaho, and l owned by the Carnation Dairy farms that Omaha, Chicago and Detroit re-]nea r Seattle ceive more than 50 per cent of theirs ,,, .... ' ..... : ....... , ne v ne ntu mgmy speclaltz- carlot unloads fro,m this state, It isle d industries of the state which is also strikingly significant that Wash.[ going forward with great strides is GIVE SUPERVISIONTO, SCItOOL CHILD'S DIET Starting to school brings a decided change in the life of a ch'ild. The whole daily program is revised an'.t restraint and excitement are exper- ienced. To counteract this new strain careful attention should be given to his diet so that he may remain in )erfect health, says Miss Esther Sol- leg, exLenslon specialist in foods and nutrition. A good basic daily diet for school children should include all the follow- ing foods (leclares Miss Selleg: Ore, quart of milk, two servings of fruit, three servings of vegetables includ- ing potatoes, two servings of peas, meat, cheese, or dried beans or eggs, two servings of whole grain cereal and at least one quart of water. (Continued on Next Page) !i,i/.;i[:i?!i i :::!;:!:"::::!:!I::Y:':: ..................... .:.::::::::.:....., ........................................................  ::,.:, !i:;i:; ::i;i/::, ?::; ::ii::i!:;!i!:: :'2,: :!:}2!: i i:!;!iii!;ii::ii i2 ii:i;ilh!; !iis:iki ::i!iiiiiii! ?! !!?!bi[!!i  [7! 212ii!iiii i2: 5!!i[!7.17 !ii!!::! !/;2! iii ! . The northwest is rich in timber resources, yet no one urges forest fires to use up the forests. Water power, another re. source, must also be develo oped economically to meet the need for power in this growing " " terntory. (. ,;iii::iilll :iii'iii:i!i!i! r':: ............... i :i:!i:i!ii!!F::.q .ii}iiiiiiiiiii!!iiiii!!!ii ,!!iiii!!!iiii!iiii!iiiiiii!! :: ................. :!iiii!i !il;i!:iii!i!!iiii iii;i i [i ;iiii2siii:ii"ii  . r -A . A HOT COMBINATION I00 Degrees and Higher and No Insulation! Think how much cooler 18 or 20 degrees would make. This can be realized by insulating the ceil- ing with Balsam Wool. Balsom Wool is a blanket one-half inch thick that will pay for itself in fuel saving in less than four years. YOU PAY FOR IT WHETHER YOU BUY IT OR NOT :weather "(luring the growing season, PAINT SALE STILL ON and a long dry summer, such as is[ common to a greater or less degree  in many parts of the eastern section,  is ideally suited fr grain prductin' ii ......... W O lY but unfavorable to any other c0m-I hand, the humid sectm Washington, with a i llutldea season, make dairying a pract cal : forra of agriculture in that section, s ..: ." --_-- ..'.." :...:. -:..:v.--::.:: . . . ..