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Quad City Herald
Brewster, Washington
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April 5, 1929     Quad City Herald
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April 5, 1929
 

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BREWSTEP. tlERALD BREWSTER WASHINGTON , APRIL 5, 1929 "dd ii" i i 'i l Crimson & Wh it e ii VOLUME 5, APRIL 5, 1929 NUMBER 27. .... STAFF F.iltor .......... Mary Jane MePhern Amflstant Edt ............ Ella Knewiton Reportorial StaffMemben of II Class DELEGATES TO PULLMAN i A conference of the representatives from the Junior and Senior classes will be held at Pullman, April 18 19 and 20 The following delegates will represent the Brewster High School: Emily Dowell Jim Vaughan and Rich- ard Bassett. The purpose of this conference is to get acquainted with college life and hear the various experts upon various phases of vocational guidance This conference was started last year but this is the first year Brew- ter high school has sent delegates. The delegates will have a wonderful opportunity to receive advice and guidance Concerning their future am- bitions---They will also Ibe able to bring back a great deal Of informa- tion for the other members of the student body. g THE EARLY STRAW HAT If a boy came to school this moll- ing, the first of April, wearing a summer straw hat, what would you say tim? You would dotbtless say smething and say it with emphasis. You wouldn't do such a thing your- self. You know spring isn't here you know the season for straw hats doesn't come for a long time yet; you make fun of any one who tries to "force the season." But how is it in the classroom? Don't you find a tendency to force the season there? Isn't there a ten- dency, as soon as February is over to justify a laziness which exists nearly all the year with the consoling reflection that it is hard to study in spring weather? Warm weather is not here yet, but don't .we tend to force the intellectual straw hat sea- son. Theoretically according to the calendar March is a spring month. Of course we have to study or flunk--even when it is warm. But many people make spring more of an excuse when there is no spring than when there is. They begin by think-i ing that it will be warm, not yet, but soon and then it will be hard to study Therefore let's think how hard it's going to be and not do any more than we must now. The winter of our discontent is still with us and will be until the last of May. Intellectual straw hats will then be in season. Keep on your furs. WOMEN'S RIGHTS i i A certain school's principal had throe benches out in the park where boys could carve their initials on them and some time a man could say "Yes these are the president's initials He cut them there when he was in Is.heel in 1908, If I remember right. ly." This ii all very well but what a- bout the rights of the girls to remind us of those who were great leaders? In some cases the girls demand benches too. but how many girls can carve their initials? So why can't they have a piece of goods some where on which they can stitch their initials, this would be better fitted to their sex. GETTING TO WORK Everything tends toward getting to work now but spring fever. This is the time of year when the energy of nature is shown most clearly, and when everythlng starts again with new vigor and life. The housewife sees to it that the terrible ordeal of housecleaning is well under way. And if you have not already seen to your sprng shopping you are late. But still at this time of year some of us are afflicted with spring fever. This is mostly shown in our school work. The Junior prom is over, and with the grade marks coming out next Monday everything implies that we should forget spring vacation and get to work. The Ftudent who puts in some real ernest work now will be repaid when the warm weather comes and our pace begins to slacken a little. Such a" person will be able to enjoy himself and not have to worry about any 'back work." So get to work. I SOCIETY 1 , The Ladies Aid met at the home of Mrs. Pettit Friday afternoon, March 28." After the business meeting deli- cious refreshments were served by the hostess. B|rtbday Party Misses Verna Waddell and Verys Weaver entertained the first and sec- ond grade Sunny School classes Fri- day afternoon. The guest of honor was Toots Houtz, the occasion being her birthday. After playing many entertainin games refreshments were served by the hostesses. Ladit Club The Ladies Club of the Bar, met Thursday afternoon, March 27, at the home of Mrs. Damon .'Morris. Af- ter a social hour a dainty lunch was served. The next meeting will be held at the home of Mrs. Vernon Monroe. Young People's Association Teh Young People's Association of Bridgeport Bar met Sunday night at the Bar school house. Many of the members are planing on going to Grand Coulee April 13. Members of the different grouys; Lakeside, Che- lan Falls, Malott, T'onasket, and Brewster are also going. Perloneis Miss Gertrude and Dena Van Der Meer visited friends in Bridgeport Sunday. S ' Bessie Brown spent Easter Sun- day st her brother's home on Para- dise Hill. a,, Kenneth and Joe McPherson re- turned to Seattle after visiting with their folks. $ a t Miss Verna and Vernon Waddell made a trip to Chelan Sunday even- ing. Charter No. 9170 Reserve District No. 12 REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BREWSTER IN THE STATE OF WASHINGTON AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS ON MARCH 27, 1929 RESOURCES I. Loans and Discounts ........................................................ $97,319.17 8. United States Government securities owned ....... 2. ........... 31.450.00 4. Other bonds, steck8 and securities owned ....................... 16,598.85 6, Banldng house, $1349.72; Furniture and fix. $2466.12 ...: .... 3815.84 8. Reserve with Federal Reserve Bank .................................... 7,716.52 9. Cash and due from banks ...... 4. .......................................... 9,679.42 10. Outside checks and other cash items ...........................  ........ 138.35 11. Redemption fund from U. S. Treas. and due from U. S. Treas. ............................................ ............ 812.50 14. Other assets .... : .................................................................. J.... 130.00, TOTAL ..: ............................... ; ......... ,. ............... ................... $167,660.65 LIABILITIES 15. Capital Stock Paid In ...................................................... $25,000.00 16. Surplus .................................................................................. 5,000.00 17. Undivided profits--net ........................................................ 1.9ff.16 20 Circulating notes outstanding ... ..................................... 15,8{)0.00 ' 2! Due t banks, including certified and cashiers checks .................... .............. : ............................................................ 6,863.40. 22 Demand Deposits ....................................................... -... 100,795.71 23. Time Deposits .......................................... . ......................... 12,212.38 TOTAL .... .......................... . ................................................... 167,660.65 State of Washington, County of Okanogan as. I, W. G. Morris, Cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the ,best of my knowledge and belief. ' (SEAL) Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4h day of Ari| , :99 D. L. Gillespte, Notary Public. Correet*-attelt: L. E. Monroe; R. A. Downing; D. S. Gamble. Rev. Pedleton left for Portland Sunday evening and his son and Clyde Dowell accompanied him as far as Wenatchee. HERE AND-THERE Martin Jensen, who stayed aloft eight minutes and twenty seconds longer than any person has ever flown alone, is in a peculiar position to-day, being unable to claim he world's solo endurance record. The reason was that when he came down in Rooscvclt's field yesterday after- noon he failed to exceed by an hour or more the record of Lieutenant Royal Thonms, who made a mark in the fiehl a year ago of 35 hours, 24 mnutes anti 59 seconds. Formaton of another huge motion picture combine is in process to-day, Joseph Schenk, President Unfed Art- ists said. He just ret'urned from New York after setting in'mbion the preliminary steps for a consolidation of United Artists interests with Warner Brothers. In Miami Florida for every day the sun don't shine the newspapers are given away free. also in Phoenix, [Arizona for every rainy day the guests at hotels get ,board and room free. Boat. races have been put off for a few days in California because the ocean was too rough for any speed. GRADE NEWS Third and Fourth Grades June Clendenin and Bob Goehry won the Easter surprises for citizen- ship. The third grade has been studying abou silkworms in Geography. They have done considerable supplemen- tary reading in connection with this study. Dorothy lIiller and Maudie Orton have been absent on account of ill- ness. Rachael Morris brought us an or- iole nest whch we found very inter- esting as it differs considerably in comparison to our other nests. Seventh and Eighth Grades Those who won in the Spelling Matchcs were: Helen Lamberton, winner of the seventh grade, Harold Cox winner for the boys. Pauline Clendennin for the eighth grade and Francis Crane winner of the boys in the eighth grade. Donald Sines was the winner of the room Monday in the Spelling Match. Viril Housden is absent on account of sickness. Those who were the best in Pen- manship this week were: Frank Ed- gerton and Doris Holland. We have rearranged our room and bought green crepe paper to decorate for Spring. Those living in the country are bringing very pretty flowers for our i "EARLY DISCOVERY EARLY RECOVERY" That the campaign for the Early Diagnosis of Tuberculosis is of prime importance was emphasized by Dr. John M. Henderson, chest diagnostic- San for the Washington Tuberculosis Association. "Emphasis in the nation-wide Early Diagnosis Campaign this year is being placed.on the ehihl, as the d!agnosis of a child and an .adultt are two entirely different things for the reason that we are dealing with two entirely different types of disease "The history of any case is import- ant, especially as it pertanis to its earyl environment, anti particularly so in dealing with chihlren. It is now well understood that the chihl is nor. i born with tuberculosis .but that in- fection takes place only as a result of exposure after birth. "Thus the health anti well-being of ! our young people cannot be too care- fully guarded and a thorou'h physic- al examination at the hands of a com- petent physician may be the means of saving them from disastrous results in this strenuous age. "That the majority of cases of tu- berculosis are not being diagnosed early is well known and many a trag- edy is the result. Notlfing truer was ever said than 'Early Discovery Early Recovery.' The Early Diagnosis Campaign be- gins throughout the United States on April I continuing throughout the month and is under the direction of the Washington Tuberculosos Asso- ciation in the state That the inerest of high school students in uberculosis and its possi- ble relation to their personal succ,-ss in life is greatly underestimated is the opinion of Mrs. J. Earl Thornton field secretary for the Washington Tu,berculosis Association, who (luring th epast eighteen months, has appear- ed on the assembly program of high school in twenty-one vounties in the state in connection with the Early Diagnosis Campaign of the Associa- tion. "Every high school student is look- ing forward eagerly to the time when he can offer his services to the world," said Mrs. Thornton "En- thusiasm for this adventure often ov- er shadows their appreciation of the need of a healthy body as well as a tranied mind. It is an interesting ex- ,erience to have the opportunity of ,resenting to such groups the co.di ;ions which will likely confront the'n when they enter the industrial field. "It is easy to make the high school student realize that an employer de- mands and is entitled to a full day's pay. Using their own stuent body as a possible group of applicants they can readily see for themselves the large number who could not reason- ably expect to be selected on this ba- sis. "When the matter is called to their attention, they appreciate that the hollow-eye(I fatigued looking individ- ual must compete with the alert, keel applicant who radiates health and en- ergy. "With these facts before them, it is also easy to present the insidiou nature of tuberculosis, which destroys room. one oUt of every four that die when life is at higt tide, between the ages JOKES [of fifteen and forty-five, and to out- , [line the immediate and emphatic need Grandma: Oh Jenny, darling. I m for adequate hours of sleep and rest, surprised aren't you going to give for sufficient and balanced ,meals and your brother part of your apple? careful attention to personal hygiene, Jenny: No, Grandma. Eve did if their great adventure is to be a that and she's been criticized ever since. Pat: Do you sleep on the flat o your back? Mike: No, the back of my flat. m Angry Woman: This vanishing joyful realization and their services be of value. "During the past week, material on the Early Diagnosis Campaign con- siing of leaflets, pamphlets and posters have been sent to the thirty- two tuberculosis leagues in the state for distribution and display during the intensive campaign which began cream is a fake. Druggist: How, Madam? A. W.: i've used it on my feet ev- ery night for two weeks and they are still as large as they ever were. Hungry customer (to slow waiter) : Waiter bring me onions and steak with a tomato salad and now and then drop me a postcard or two :while you are gone. Scotchmen never wear suspenders because they are afraid that they might give. Son to father: Dad, did you go to Sunday School when you were a little boy ? Father: I certainly did son and I never missed a Sunday. Son: I think I will quit going, Dad. Father: Why Son? Son: Well dad, I don't think it will do me any goodi either. Wonder why the pacifists haven't started a drive against our Red, White and Blue song because it con- i[tanis a line about "the army and na- :'vy forever?" [ April 1st. The New York telephone directory will be published this summer in five separate and distinct volumes. Prob- ably no other series of books in the world can be found containing so many funny characters. It is reported that 'in the present revolution the Mexican aviators have done a great deal of damage but mostly to themselves. Scientists say that prety soon they will be making clothing out of asbes- tos that will be silkier than silk and will .wear better than immespun. This will be great for the fellow who is on his way to hell and in a hurry to get there. The new $1 bill has the picture of George Washington on it and the Sic 000 bears that of Chase. It's a good bet Washington will get the most pub licity out of it. The average man never realizes what little good his high school aIge- bra is to him until he sits down to figure out his income tax. SENIOR PLAY IS POSTPONED The Senior Play "The Adventures ofGrandpa." which was schedured to be presented in the high school gym to-night has been postponed until next Wednesday. There are nine persons in the cast, ] most of them seniors, they are; Dick Lawless, Albert Gillcspie, Olin Pen- dleton, Sidney Braker, Lee .Pettit, Mary Jane McPherson, Lola Jolmson, Alice Waddell, and Emily Dowell. The cast has been studying for sev- eral weeks past and have had quite a number of rehearsels, the play shouhl be very entertaining. Reserved seat tickets are on sale at the Brewster Drug Store. A1 Smith's radio appeal for funds to help pay the deficit of the Demo- cratic pmy brought results from South Africa where an admirer of the former governor sat down and mailed a fat check. Wonder what re- ceiving set this guy was using? ' In the (,arly spring when fresh v,getables:, are scarce be sure the meals contain vitamins. This will e- liminate the need of spring tonic. IODINE WORKS WONDERS combined with pure honey base it instantly stops coughs, croup Hay fever and catarrah Goiter is also helped. You can now buy iodized honey under the name of HONEYDINE. It is guaranteed .by its makers and by the Brewster Drug Co. Dr. Bernard Jankelson DENTIST Pateros, Wash. OFFICE HOUR 9 to 5 WED. AND SAT 9 to 1. Stop at the Lincoln Fountain and have a cool re- freshing drink like only the Lincoln Fountain can dispense. P. S. Leave your laundry and cleaning at the same time. They will be taken care of in nice shap MODEL LAUNDRY & CLEANERS OF OMAK C C oC.C C C C C C C O. STEPHENS C C Palmer Chiropractor C C "Wnaere Sick Folk* Get W[" C C HOURS C C Monday and Wednesday C C Friday and Saturday C C 10-12 2-5 7-8 C C Tuesday and Thursday Phones C C 2.5 Re. 181. Office 02 C C Croak, Washington C C C C C C C C C C C C C i t @ .]r.loQAm ooa"z"t LIII"ItI.&O' OOSP,LMlt &' M a Jk, J N !1111 M(. Itt Promot ,no Accurate Weft. SERVICE The best definition of the wor0 "SERVICE" Is install a telephone. Brewer Telephone Excha'nge. i i THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK LOCATED IN BREWSTER, WASHINGTON THE BEST LOCATION IN OKANOGAN COUNTY When you start your spring gar- den, do it right, by using certi- fied quality ,seeds. We have them in all varieties and quanti ties. Buy your supply now while there is a large variety to choose from. A' few more days of this warm weather will put the garden plot in shap planting of the more hardy varieties. for BREWSTER DEPARTMENT STORE FOR QUICK, EASY STARTING SHELL "Dry Gas" BREWsTER OIL C0 L. CAMPBELL